Have you been inspired by all the local garments so far? If not, I’ll leave you with these tantalising tidbits from Europe!

I believe that all the European participants were surprised, firstly, at how difficult it was to find locally made textiles.  And secondly, with a bit of persistence and digging, at the diversity of niche local textiles available.  Charlotte is constantly adding to her fantastic list of resources here:

Some of the must read posts:

 

The wonderfully local completed garments so far:

Charlotte from English Girl at Home

Charlotte had started natural dyeing before she came to the project, and the diversity of her colour palette really reflects that experience.  I am absolutely in awe of the local silk that she sourced for her dress!  For Charlotte, buying local has become the norm and the full list of British garments she made can be seen here.

” Thanks to #1year1outfit, local (which in my case means British) fibres have become a real passion. The project led me to really question and explore exactly what fabrics and fibres are produced in Britain… Exploring currently available British textiles also led me to give greater consideration to the historic textile industry, both to celebrate the beautiful things produced and the skill required to produce them, but also to be aware of the conditions many of these textiles were produced under. In Britain that included child labour, serious health risks for workers, long hours for low pay, and exploitation of the Empire.”

Naturally Dyed Silk Dress for #1year1outfit

 

Steely Seamstress

Also from the UK, the Steely Seamstress has been giving tantalising glimpses of her almost complete outfit.   She is working on a naturally dyed silk top, linen pants complete with ceramic buttons and a tweed hacking jacket. She talks openly about all of the choices and compromises she has had to make along the way, making it a fascinating story.

Jacket on hanger

Fly shield revealed

Ute from Germany

Ute, like me, began 2015 with next to zero knitting skills.  Her commitment to mastering this skills shows in her final outfit, complete with linen dress dyed with avocado pits.

“Sourcing yarn was the easiest, learning to make my own knitting pattern and knitting such a complex piece the hardest part. I had only knit scarves and shawls before.

Sourcing all German made fabric was quite difficult. Germany used to be an important producer of linen, but there are only a few mills left and most flax comes from European neighbouring countries or even China. Hemp and nettle fabric used to be manufactured in Germany as well, but only come from China and even Tibet now. I finally found a shop that sells German organic linen and used this for my dress.”

 

See the Australian and NZ local outfits here, and the US outfits here.

 

A very humble thank you to all of those who have joined me on this journey, I look forward to the 2016 adventure!  I will also share more completed outfit stories with you throughout the year as other participants finish their outfits.

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